Category Archives: Customer Satisfaction

The Four Main Obstacles Getting In the Way of a Great Customer Experience

By | CCM, Changing Technology, CRM, Customer Engagement, Customer Experience, Customer Experience Strategy, Customer Insights, Customer Journey Mapping, Customer Relationship Management, Customer Satisfaction, Customer Service, Digital Customer Engagement, Digital Transformation, Enterprise Information Management | No Comments

Most organisations are well aware of the need for a focused customer experience strategy. In spite of their great intentions, for many organisations, creating a solid customer experience is fraught with a number of pitfalls. There are some common mistakes that we see people make time and time again when they are trying to create a strong customer experience strategy.

Here are four of the most common obstacles that could be getting in the way of you offering a great customer experience to your customers:

  1. Too much focus on day to day operations, not enough on innovation and strategy. This is a common problem we see. Even in organisations that are taking an integrated approach to their customer experience, the customer service or marketing team are often left with more than their fair share of tasks like managing social media pages, responding to customer queries and other time sucking tasks. By spending too much time on these jobs, there is less time for innovative marketing strategies that will actually grow the organisation. The answer here is to share out those tasks more fairly and give other departments access to social media pages or data platforms so they can free up some time.
  2. Data siloes. While we all know how important it is to gather data and keep track of it, what do we do with it once we have it? For many organisations the problem is not the amount of data they have, it’s figuring out how to make use of it in a constructive way without getting overwhelmed. Just like integrating your systems is important, if you’re going to get the full benefit of your data you also need to integrate it across different platforms. Doing this manually is going to take a lot of time and hard work so finding an integrated solution that does it for you is essential.
  3. Lack of understanding of social commerce. Social commerce is an emerging trend and it’s becoming increasingly common for customers to buy products directly from social media platforms. Unfortunately, for many organisations this has led to confusion as people struggle to get to grips with this new technology. If you enable social commerce for your organisation it’s important that you spend the time training your staff on how it actually works. Social commerce is still in its infancy and it’s not as user friendly as it could be just yet.
  4. Lack of relevant skills. More and more of customer experience strategy hinges on social media. This means that having the skills to understand how social media marketing works and understand how customers are using social platforms to interact with brands can be extremely useful. Without these skills it’s going to be difficult for your team to do their job effectively. Make sure your team have the opportunity to learn the skills they need or outsource some of the more skilled tasks to specialists.

Don’t let these common obstacles get in the way of your customer experience strategy. Break through them and you can get your organisation on the path to a more successful customer experience strategy.

The Four Main Obstacles Getting In the Way of a Great Customer Experience

By | CCM, Changing Technology, CRM, Customer Communication Management, Customer Engagement, Customer Experience, Customer Experience Strategy, Customer Insights, Customer Journey Mapping, Customer Relationship Management, Customer Satisfaction, Customer Service, Digital Customer Engagement, Digital Transformation, Enterprise Information Management | No Comments

Most organisations are well aware of the need for a focused customer experience strategy. In spite of their great intentions, for many organisations, creating a solid customer experience is fraught with a number of pitfalls. There are some common mistakes that we see people make time and time again when they are trying to create a strong customer experience strategy.

Here are four of the most common obstacles that could be getting in the way of you offering a great customer experience to your customers:

  1. Too much focus on day to day operations, not enough on innovation and strategy. This is a common problem we see. Even in organisations that are taking an integrated approach to their customer experience, the customer service or marketing team are often left with more than their fair share of tasks like managing social media pages, responding to customer queries and other time sucking tasks. By spending too much time on these jobs, there is less time for innovative marketing strategies that will actually grow the organisation. The answer here is to share out those tasks more fairly and give other departments access to social media pages or data platforms so they can free up some time.
  2. Data siloes. While we all know how important it is to gather data and keep track of it, what do we do with it once we have it? For many organisations the problem is not the amount of data they have, it’s figuring out how to make use of it in a constructive way without getting overwhelmed. Just like integrating your systems is important, if you’re going to get the full benefit of your data you also need to integrate it across different platforms. Doing this manually is going to take a lot of time and hard work so finding an integrated solution that does it for you is essential.
  3. Lack of understanding of social commerce. Social commerce is an emerging trend and it’s becoming increasingly common for customers to buy products directly from social media platforms. Unfortunately, for many organisations this has led to confusion as people struggle to get to grips with this new technology. If you enable social commerce for your organisation it’s important that you spend the time training your staff on how it actually works. Social commerce is still in its infancy and it’s not as user friendly as it could be just yet.
  4. Lack of relevant skills. More and more of customer experience strategy hinges on social media. This means that having the skills to understand how social media marketing works and understand how customers are using social platforms to interact with brands can be extremely useful. Without these skills it’s going to be difficult for your team to do their job effectively. Make sure your team have the opportunity to learn the skills they need or outsource some of the more skilled tasks to specialists.

Don’t let these common obstacles get in the way of your customer experience strategy. Break through them and you can get your organisation on the path to a more successful customer experience strategy.

5 Steps to Starting and Implementing a Successful CX Strategy

By | CCM, Changing Technology, CRM, Customer Communication Management, Customer Engagement, Customer Experience, Customer Experience Strategy, Customer Insights, Customer Journey Mapping, Customer Relationship Management, Customer Satisfaction, Customer Service, Digital Customer Engagement, Digital Transformation, Enterprise Information Management | No Comments

Successful customer experience is the cornerstone of a successful business, but how do you actually do it? Customer experience can be one of those hard to define concepts but there are a few simple strategies you can use to create a more customer friendly organisation and enjoy the benefits that a successful customer experience strategy can bring you.

Here are five steps we would recommend to anyone who wants to start and implement a successful customer experience strategy.

  1. Create a strong foundation. Sometimes you need to go back to the beginning if you’re going to grow effectively. This means focusing on creating a strong, scalable architecture for your business. Go back to basics and look at your business processes, technology and social media platforms and think about how you can create a strong basic structure that will let you adapt and grow in the future.
  2. Take time to understand your customers. It might take some time and effort to establish meaningful relationships with your customers but it’s well worth it in the end. By taking some time to get to know your customers you can develop a mutually beneficial relationship that is based on trust. This means seeing your customers as more than a means to an end, but getting to know what really makes them tick. This is a long-term approach that can make a huge difference to your business bottom line and the quality of your customer relationships.
  3. Get everyone on the same page. Providing a great customer experience is not just the job of your sales or customer service staff. To create a truly customer centred organisation you’re going to need the support of everyone in your organisation. Encourage all your employees to rally around the customer and make them the main focus and you’ll be well on your way to providing a great customer experience.
  4. Listen. To really understand what your customers value and how your organisation is tracking at meeting their needs you will need to listen to them. This means using data to gain an insight into your customers’ needs and priorities. You can also spend some time talking to them, measuring how they react to your social media pages and anything else that will let you really listen to them instead of making assumptions about what they want.
  5. Measure your results. A successful customer experience strategy will have a measurable impact on your business. If you don’t measure the results you’ll have no way to tell if your strategy is actually working. Make evaluation and measurement a regular part of your customer experience strategy.

Implementing a successful customer experience strategy doesn’t have to be complicated but it will require some work on your part. Hopefully these five pointers can get you started in the right direction.

Customer Experience: What is it Exactly?

By | CCM, Changing Technology, CRM, Customer Communication Management, Customer Engagement, Customer Experience, Customer Experience Strategy, Customer Insights, Customer Journey Mapping, Customer Relationship Management, Customer Satisfaction, Customer Service, Digital Customer Engagement, Digital Transformation, Enterprise Information Management | No Comments

You’ve probably heard how important customer experience is to organisations, but what exactly is it? While the term customer experience might be commonplace among management speak, there are still a lot of misunderstandings around what the term really means and how you can define customer experience in a way that everyone in your organisation will understand.

Your customers’ experiences can be defined as the overall sum of how they feel at every interaction they have with your brand. If you make your customers feel good overall, you’re going to leave them with a positive customer experience. On the other hand, if the overall sum of their interactions with you leaves them with a negative feeling, chances are they are going to think of their experience with you as negative, even if they did have some positive interactions during the process.

If you want to gain control over the way your customers feel about your organisation and ensure they are left feeling good about you, you have to be proactive. This means taking the approach of actively managing your customer experiences. Customer experience management is an emerging field at the moment but it’s something that we’re going to see a lot more of in the future.

Many organisations make the mistake of viewing customer experience management as solely a function of their customer service department. Unfortunately this approach can lead to difficulties as increasingly customers come into contact with multiple facets of your organisation and the quality of experience they have will depend on them having a universally positive, consistent experience across the board.

A holistic approach is essential when you’re looking to improve your customer experience overall. Think about when your customers come into contact with your business. Is it just when they deal with customer service? Chances are they already look at your website, your social media pages, download reports and other information, go and visit you in person or pick up the phone and give you a call. They probably use a variety of platforms to get in touch with you including their mobile, your app, email, instant chat and in person conversations.

Great customer experience management means creating a fantastic experience across the whole spectrum of your customer interactions. Customer experience is so much more than just a customer service function – your technology needs to support your customer experience focus along with every department within your organisation.

How to Use Data to Provide a Personalised Customer Experience

By | CCM, Changing Technology, CRM, Customer Communication Management, Customer Engagement, Customer Experience, Customer Experience Strategy, Customer Insights, Customer Relationship Management, Customer Satisfaction, Uncategorized | No Comments

Personalisation is more than just a marketing buzzword. Thanks to social media and the age of mobile technology, customers now expect businesses to provide services that are tailored to them. Organisations that don’t meet these expectations run the risk of falling behind to their competitors.

Fortunately there are a number of ways you can create a more personalised customer experience in your organisation and many of these ways involve data. Most organisations have access to a huge range of data about their customers and with a strategic approach this data can be used to enhance the experience for your customers, improving customer loyalty at the same time.

Use social data

Social media can give you a huge range of valuable information if you know how to interpret it, and this lets you see in real time what your customers are saying about you and gauge their reactions to your business. Many organisations still see their social media pages as a marketing tool but limiting your use of social media to advertising means you’re missing out on a lot of the potential that social media can give your organisation.

There are a number of platforms, such as Sprinklr, that can help you analyse social data so you can see what your customers like on a personal level. By monitoring your social media pages and responding to queries and complaints on an individual basis you can provide that one on one personalised attention that your customers have come to expect.

Make adjustments in real-time

A large part of providing a personalised level of customer service means meeting your customers’ needs in real time. Personalisation doesn’t just mean giving your customers what they want, it means giving them what they want at the time they want it and for this you want real time data. Having access to real-time data means you can be more flexible and adaptable to your customers’ changing individual needs at any given time.

Integrate customer data for a full picture

Great personalisation starts with understanding your customers. If you know who they are it’s going to be much easier to personalise your communication with them. By integrating your customer data from different sources you can get a clear picture of your customers from multiple different angles and in different contexts. This will help you understand them better and therefore serve them up a far better experience.

Data is a crucial tool for organisations that want to provide a personalised, quality experience for their customers. Hopefully these three suggestions will help you put data to good use in your organisation, for the benefit of your customers.

Are We In the Age of the Customer?

By | Customer Experience, Customer Satisfaction, Salesforce | No Comments

If you’ve been keeping an ear to the ground you’ve probably heard rumours about the ‘age of the customer’. While there’s no denying that we’ve entered a period where customer experience and satisfaction is more important than ever before, is customer experience really the be all and end all we’re led to believe?

While it might sound a bit over the top to talk about it as the ‘age of the customer,’ according to the Salesforce blog that’s exactly where we are now. Customers are now at the centre of the entire business process and as customer centred businesses grow, we’re all going to have to accept these changes if we’re going to be able to keep up.

According to Salesforce there are a number of signs that indicate the age of the customer is now upon us. Here are a few of our favourites:

  1. Everyone has a smartphone. With smartphone technology becoming ubiquitous, virtually every single customer now has a purchasing device in his or her pocket. It’s no longer up to customers to go to a physical store if they want to make a purchase, they expect brands to be available to them, on the device of their choosing, 24/7.
  2. The Internet of Things. It’s not just phones that allow customers to connect, it’s everything. Ordinary household appliances are now capable of remembering a customer’s preferences and delivering them an experience that is tailored to them specifically. Brands need to be able to do the same if they want to keep up.
  3. Social media allows the flow of ideas. Customers are increasingly able to connect with each other and share ideas over social networks. There are communities set up for just about every possible interest and idea you can think about and its up to marketers and brands to get in on the action by giving customers a place where they can come together and share their ideas.
  4. Personalisation is huge. Now that we have the technology available for intensive personalisation, it’s becoming an expectation. Brands now have the means to place their customers at the centre of their process through tools like automation, where it just wouldn’t have been possible before.

The combination of technological development and changing customer expectations has created a perfect storm with the customer at the centre.

Organisations need to put their customers first if they are going to succeed – those who continue to resist this development are going to find they start losing customers very soon. Make sure your organisation is set up to thrive in the age of the customer by making customer experience a priority now.